Best Fish for 3 Gallon Tank

The best fish for 3 gallon tank is any small, low-maintenance species. Many fish can be found at your local pet store that are perfect for smaller tanks! Some of these include: Neon Tetras, Guppies, and Corydoras Catfish. All three of these options are great because they’re very hardy but also don’t need too much space or attention from their owners to stay healthy.

What is the Best Fish for 3 Gallon Tank

1. Betta Fish

The male Betta fish is not only known as one of the best pets to keep in a 3 gallon tank, but also as one of the most beautiful freshwater tropical fish. They are native to Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia where they inhabit hot, oxygen-rich environments like rice paddies and flooded forests. Bettas prefer warmer water temperatures (around 22 degrees C or 72 degrees Fahrenheit).

These fish are popular due to their small size, brilliant colors and exclusive shapes. Bettas come in almost every color imaginable from yellows to reds to blues. Their fins come in many different designs including veils (which cover all the way around the body) butterfly tails (the top fin extends straight down), crown tail (top fin extends straight up), half-moons (horizontal fins curve inwards slightly) and of course the delta tails as seen on Siamese fighting fish.

Bettas are known for how long they can breathe out of water, often called “air breathers”. Though it depends on the air temperature, most bettas can live up to five days without air. The male Betta is best kept alone if possible because he will fight with other males—especially over territory or females.

Requirements: A 3 gallon tank should be used for one betta fish, containing at least 2 gallons of water; a heater set between 22-26 degrees Celsius (72-79 degrees Fahrenheit) is needed to keep the water between these temperatures; the aquarium should be decorated with rocks, plants, and hiding spaces.

2. Least Killifish

Least killifish make great pets for children because they are colorful and have interesting behavior such as burrowing into sand and resting motionless for hours until disturbed. These fish are completely blind so they find their way around by using chemo-receptors in their bodies that detect vibrations caused by moving objects (human fingers) above them.

Least killifish can also swim backward which is unique among most other types of fish who typically only move forward or sideways. Like many bottom dwellers species like bettas, least killies enjoy cooler water temperatures: around 22 degrees C or equivalent to 72 degrees Fahrenheit.

These fish are also from parts of Asia, namely China and Vietnam where they live in swamps and rice paddies. Killifish come in many different colors including blues, yellows, reds, greens (wild-type), blacks (Moori type) and a variety of mottled patterns along with combinations or all of the colors listed above.

Requirements: A 5 gallon tank should be used for least killifish—a heater is not needed but one can be added if the temperature drops below 22 degrees C; plenty of floating plants and hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees; bottom dwelling small rocks so these fish can burrow into them; it is important to keep at least gravel and sand in the tank as these fish use them for shelter.

3. Endler’s Livebearer

Endler’s livebearer (Poecilia wingei) is known to be one of the most peaceful species among all fish—not aggressive towards other fish but may nip occasionally if it feels threatened. The males are brilliantly colored with a red belly, two black spots on each flank, brilliant blue eyes and an orange caudal fin while females are smaller than males; both lack pigmentation on their bellies so they have a white or yellow tint instead of red coloration.

These fish breed quite easily with dominant male(s) trying to court female(s) by swimming around them, making a clicking sound and quivering their fins. Endler’s livebearers are from the tropics of South America (mainly Venezuela) where they can be found in muddy streams or pools. These fish prefer water temperatures between 21-27 degrees Celsius (70-80 degrees Fahrenheit).

Requirements: A 10 gallon tank should be used for Endler’s livebearers—a heater is not needed if the room temperature is between 18-21 degrees C or equivalent to 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit but one can be added if necessary; at least sand/gravel substrate so these fish have something to burrow into; floating plants and hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees; a large school of endler’s is best kept in 20+ gallon tanks.

4. Asian Stone Catfish

Asian stone catfish are one of the most peaceful bottom dwellers for fish tanks around 3 gallons. These fish love to lay eggs and will lay up to 1,500 eggs at a time (equivalent in some cases to laying more than her own weight in eggs). They can be bred quite easily as long as there is more males than females or an individual male with multiple females.

Females usually have better colors than males, but they both prefer cooler water temperatures: 22-24 degrees C or equivalent to 72-75 degrees Fahrenheit; these Asian stone catfish come from fast moving waters in South East Asia where they eat plants and insects. Asian stone catfish are considered to be peaceful, non-aggressive fish that can be kept with smaller species of fish.

Requirements: A 5 gallon tank is a good home for these fish—a heater should not be needed if the room temperature remains warm; plenty of floating plants and hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees; a sand/gravel substrate so these fish have somewhere to hide or lay eggs (they don’t mind laying eggs on rocks); one male for every 3 females or otherwise the female will become stressed from being pounced upon by the male(s) all day everyday.

5. Pygmy Gourami

Pygmy gouramis are small, colorful fish that can be kept in a community tank with other small non-aggressive species. These fish are from India where they live in slow moving streams and ponds; these fish prefer cooler waters between 23-26 degrees Celsius (73-79 degrees Fahrenheit).

Requirements: A 5 gallon tank is ideal for pygmy gourami—a heater should not be needed if the room temperature remains warm; plenty of hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees; floating plants recommended but not necessary as long as there are hiding places available; gravel/sand substrate so they have somewhere to hide or lay eggs (they don’t mind laying eggs on rocks); one male for every 3 females or otherwise the female will become stressed from being pounced upon by the male(s) all day everyday.

6. Pea Puffer Fish

Pea puffers are one of the most unusual species to have in an aquarium—they look like a small piece of green slime and sometimes they don’t even move (looking like a plant) but when they do, their eyes bulge outwards and dart around! These guys are very hardy fish that can tolerate different water parameters; they can be kept in 3 gallon tanks but its best to keep them with other non-aggressive species such as tetras or killies so they don’t feel threatened by bigger fish which could eat them.

These fish come from the rivers of Japan where they live in schools; their preferred water temperatures are 20-28 degrees C or 68-82 degrees Fahrenheit; they enjoy floating plants and hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees. Pea puffers can be kept in 3 gallon tanks for a while but they grow up to 2 inches long so if one is wanting them to stay smaller, then it would be best to keep them in something like a 5 gallon tank. Fun Fact: these fish have been known to eat small aquatic insects (such as mosquito larvae) whole!

Requirements: A 10 gallon tank is ideal for keeping pea puffers—they do not require a heater unless the room temperature is kept below 72 degrees Fahrenheit; plenty of hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees; floating plants recommended but not necessary as long as there are hiding places available; a sand/gravel substrate so they have somewhere to hide or lay eggs (they don’t mind laying eggs on rocks); one male for every 3 females or otherwise the female will become stressed from being pounced upon by the male(s) all day everyday.

6. Bumblebee Goby

Bumblebee gobies are small bottom dwellers that can be kept in a community tank with other small non-aggressive species that prefer cooler waters between 23-28 degrees Celsius (73-82 degrees Fahrenheit).

These fish are from Indonesia where they live in shallow waters of lakes and slow moving streams; these fish prefer cooler waters between 23-28 degrees Celsius (73-82 degrees Fahrenheit). A 5 gallon tank is ideal for bumblebee gobies—a heater should not be needed if the room temperature remains warm.

They do enjoy floating plants so its best to keep them with other small non-aggressive species such as tetras or killies but plenty of hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees are recommended as well, especially for when nighttime comes.

7. Scarlet Gem Fish

This colorful little guy is a very popular fish among aquarists who have never kept bettas before because – unlike bettas – these guys don’t nip fins nor do you need a female to be the aggressor to stop them from nipping betta fins in a community tank. These fish are from Thailand where they live in shallow, muddy waters of rice paddies and slow moving streams; their preferred water temperatures are 25-28 degrees C or 77-82 degrees Fahrenheit.

A 5 gallon tank is ideal for scarlet gems—a heater should not be needed if the room temperature remains warm; lots of hiding spaces such as clay pots/terrariums or artificial aquarium trees for whenever it becomes dark out, floating plants are recommended but not necessary as long as there are hiding places available; a sand/gravel substrate so they have somewhere to hide or lay eggs (they don’t mind laying eggs on rocks); one male for every 3 females.

FAQ: Best Fish for 3 Gallon Tank

How Many Fish Can Be In A 3-Gallon Tank?

You may think that a 3-gallon tank is the ideal size for keeping aquatic life, but it’s not. If you want to keep more than three 1-inch fish in your water home, then make sure each one has their own gallon of space for swimming! Of course if they’re all different sizes or species and are friendly with other fishes then you could probably get away with 4 inches per gallon rule instead.

How many bettas can I put in a 3 gallon tank?

No, bettas do not play well in general and 3 gallons is tiny – you’re going to need 20 minimum for a friend of your betta. Few fish species play with them well from what I’ve heard.